CELTICS – Gods and Goddesses, page 1

This is a page with much more details about the characters in the “Celtics” series.

Maeve and Ailill had seven sons, all called Maine. They originally all had other names, but when Maeve asked a Druid which of her sons would kill Conchobar, he replied, “Maine”. She did not have a son called Maine, so she renamed all her sons as follows:

Fedlimid became Maine Athramail (“like his father”)
Cairbre became Maine Máthramail (“like his mother”)
Eochaid became Maine Andoe (“the swift”) and was also known as Cich-Maine Andoe or Cichmuine[14]
Fergus became Maine Taí (“the silent”)
Cet became Maine Mórgor (“of great duty”)
Sin became Maine Mílscothach (“honey-speech”)
Dáire became Maine Móepirt (“beyond description”)
The prophecy was fulfilled when Maine Andoe went on to kill Conchobar, son of Arthur, son of Bruide — not Conchobar, son of Fachtna Fathach, as Medb had assumed the druid meant.[12] Medb and Ailill also had a daughter, Findabair.[15]

[15] A. H. Leahy (ed. & trans.), “Tain Bo Fraech”

Not everything with the Celtics is serious and gloomy. There is also great laughter!

LEAD CHARACTER MOOD BOARD – INFORMAL

These are mood test videos to bring out the psychology within the Gods, their powers of visualization, inspiration and superhuman existence. They range from a Classical traditional type texture, pacing and atmosphere, to radical transformations that capture the fusion of Celtic cultural iconography.

MAEVE – CLASSICAL TO INSPIRATION VFX

MAEVE – INSPIRATION VFX ONLY

BRIGID – CLASSICAL

MACHA – ATMOSPHERIC

AERONWEN – CLASSICAL TO INSPIRATION VFX

AERONWEN – INSPIRATION VFX ONLY

AERONWEN – CLASSICAL ONLY

 

HISTORY  OF DRUID GODDESS MAEVE

Queen Maeve has the 2nd largest tomb in Ireland, it is dated to around 3,000 BC.

 

A Goddess of Sovereignty[2][3], War[4], Earth and Fertility.  Medb (pronounced maiv) is described in The Metrical Dindsenchas “Fert Medba” Poem 128, as a fair haired wolf queen, whose form was so beautiful that it robbed men of two-thirds of their valor upon seeing her.[1] There is much false information about Maeve. Under careful study and research, we can learn that she was given away in an arranged marriage when she was very young to the King of Ulster. It left lifelong damage on her. So much so that she: 1. Ran away from the marriage. 2. After she ran away, her sister was given as replacement, and to save her sister from the torture, she killed her sister. 3. When Maeve had kids with Aillil, she had all of her 7 sons made assassins in order to kill him.

Maeve was apparently, according to the historical record, a survivor of childhood rape, i.e. being sold, given, in an arranged marriage, probably while very young, to a much older man (King of Ulster). Her tomb is dated to about 3,000 BC, which would put her in position to have influenced the rise of Celtic Brehon Law which gave many civil rights to women in marriage. While history, largely written, altered, by the Christian monks, has tried to portray her, simply because of her beauty, as promiscuous, which she was not, as all her children were with her husband Aillil. This series is to set the record straight and tell the truth of Maeve and how great she was. Christian Monks in Ireland, out of jealousy, called her beauty that of a whore and prostitute. But it was because she withheld her beauty from all men after her childhood rape in marriage, that built her resentment from the male Monks. Very likely it was the true history of Maeve that was fundamental to the development of Celtic Brehon Law and women’s rights in marriage.

The extreme hatred Maeve had toward her childhood arranged husband, the King of Ulster, proves beyond a doubt, in any rational mind, that she was a victim of childhood rape. That she ran away from it. That she saved her sister who was sent as her replacement, by killing her. Maeve raised all seven of her sons to be be lethal assassins to go kill the child rapist King of Ulster.

Development of Celtic Brehon Law and equal rights for Women in Marriage.

Celtic Druid Goddess Maeve’s role.

Marriage and Brehon Law in Ancient Ireland


True History of Celtic Goddess Maeve.

She withheld her beauty from all men, except her Aillil after her childhood rape in marriage, that built her resentment from male Christian Monks. At 3,000 BC, she was fundamental to the development of Celtic Brehon Law and women’s rights in marriage.

HISTORY OF DRUID GODDESS MACHA

HISTORY OF DRUID GOD BELENUS

HISTORY OF DRUID GODDESS AERONWEN

 

CELTIC PEOPLE  ETHNOGENESIS AT  8,500 BC ON ATLANTIC FACADE OF EUROPE

CELTIC LANGUAGE – ARRIVED IN THE CELTIC ISLANDS AS EARLY AS 4700 BC

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

Celtic Druid Wizard Hat

 

MAPS

TRAILER TESTS

ARCHAEOLOGY